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Skip Navigation LinksDNREC : Division of Fish & Wildlife : Fisheries

 

Telemetry research on juvenile Atlantic sturgeon in Delaware River
aims to put a prehistoric species back on track for recovery

 

 

Fisheries biologists remove an Atlantic sturgeon from the gill net they are tending in the lower Delaware River.Division of Fish and Wildlife fisheries biologists are currently researching the movement and habitat use of juvenile Atlantic sturgeon in the lower Delaware River using the latest telemetry methods.

 

The biologists are “tagging” Atlantic sturgeon with acoustic transmitters that can be detected under water using manual and passive tracking or “listening” devices. This allows biologists to determine the location of “tagged” sturgeon throughout the Delaware Estuary so that important juvenile habitats can be identified and protected.

Each transmitter emits a unique identification code so that individual sturgeon can be ID'd while determining its location and depth under water. This information will serve as the foundation for the development of a juvenile survey to assist in monitoring recovery of the threatened Atlantic sturgeon population.

 

Follow the photo panorama below from the netting of a juvenile sturgeon to monitoring its movements by telemetry.

 

 Measurements are taken from a juvenile Atlantic sturgeon captured in the lower Delaware River.

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





Measurements are taken from a juvenile Atlantic sturgeon
captured in the lower Delaware River.

 

  Fisheries Biologist Matt Fisher injects an Atlantic sturgeon with a t-bar tag.  The tag has a unique identifying number.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fisheries Biologist Matt Fisher injects an Atlantic sturgeon with a T-bar tag. The tag has a unique identifying number that, when recaptured, can be used to determine population size, individual growth and movement patterns.  

This sturgeon is being prepared for transmitter tag surgery by receiving oral anesthesia that flows over the gills

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

This sturgeon is being prepared for transmitter tag surgery by receiving oral anesthesia that flows over the gills while having the surgery area sterilized. 

The transmitter is carefully implanted inside the body cavity of the sturgeon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 





The transmitter is carefully implanted inside the body cavity
of the sturgeon.

 The incision in the sturgeon's ventral cavity is closed using monofilament suture material.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



The incision in the surgeon's ventral cavity is closed using monofilament suture material.
After suturing the incision, the site is covered with a Vaseline and Betadine compound to reduce chance of infection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 



After suturing the incision, the site is covered with a Vaseline and Betadine compound to reduce the chance of infection and the sturgeon is ready for release.

 

Fisheries Biologist Cathy Martin revives the sturgeon with freshwater and releases it when the fish is ready.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Fisheries Biologist Cathy Martin revives the sturgeon with
freshwater and releases the fish when it’s ready.

 

 

 Fisheries technician Jared Jacobini scans the lower Delaware River with a hydrophone for more sturgeon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Fisheries technician Jared Jacobini scans the lower Delaware River near Augustine Beach with a device called a hydrophone for more sturgeon that have been tagged with ultrasonic transmitters by the Division of Fish and Wildlife.

 

 

 

Jared Jacobini downloads data using wireless technology from a listening device attached to a navigational buoy in the river
Fisheries technician Jared Jacobini downloads data using wireless
 technology from another listening device canister that is attached to a
navigational buoy in the Delaware river. 

 

 

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