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Skip Navigation LinksDNREC : Division of Watershed Stewardship : Drainage and Stormwater Section

 
Delaware Storm Drain Marking Program

 


About the Program

In Delaware, stormwater runoff drains into the Delaware River, Delaware Bay or the Chesapeake Bay, where we spend summer days swimming, fishing and boating. Educating the public about pollutants contained within stormwater runoff is a vital, yet daunting task. This is why DNREC is working with municipalities on this issue, calling on volunteers in a coordinated effort to stamp medallions on storm drains in communities throughout the state. 

Towns with storm drains that have been marked in Delaware to date include:  

  • Newark (three developments)
  • Seaford
  • Bridgeville
  • Laurel
  • Greenwood
  • Georgetown
  • Southbridge (Wilmington)
  • Milton
  • Lewes 

More Storm Drain Marking Information  

  • Brochure for Volunteers
  • Brochure for Mailing
  • How the Program is Implemented
  •  Deerborne Woods, Barrington, and Old Post Farm Developments Near Newark, November 2009

    Girl Scout Troop 42, led by Jayne Mitchell Werbrich, replaced 45 missing or broken storm drain markers within the communities of Deerborne Woods, Barrington, and Old Post Farm near Newark on November 7, 2009. This active group of Girl Scout environmentalists also sent e-mails to community maintenance corporations notifying them of their efforts, while encouraging responsible waste disposal. “Keeping our drains free of pollutants that are hazardous to humans, fish, and wild life include: gasoline, oil, antifreeze, pesticides, fertilizers, pet waste, leaves, and grass clippings. We hope that all of our neighbors will join together, and help to keep our environment clean.”

     
     

     

    Seaford Storm Drain Marking, September 2009

    There was not a cloud in the sky on this crisp, clear day of September 19th. Volunteers scoured the streets of Seaford marking the storm drains and cleaning out garbage and debris for better street drainage. As part of Coastal Clean-up day, more than 75 volunteers participated. Volunteers comprised citizens from the area, city staff, Nanticoke River Watershed Alliance,Greenwood’s Peach Blossom 4-H club, Boy Scout Troup 182, and individuals from the local consulting firm, George, Miles, and Buher. Volunteers left with a tote bag displaying the Delaware Storm Drain Marking Program’s emblem, and a Coastal Clean-up T-shirt in appreciation for their efforts. This project was funded by EPA's Chesapeake Bay grant funding through the DNREC Watershed Assessment Section.  

     

    Bridgeville Storm Drain Marking "team"

     

    Bridgeville Storm Drain Marking, June 2009

    On June 2, 10 Key Club and ROTC Woodbridge High School students marked the storm drains in Bridgeville as part of an afterschool program coordinated by math teacher, Kelli Duncan.

    The Town of Bridgeville was also instrumental in assisting with this effort as they will be marking the drains on busy streets and in Heritage Shores once development is complete. 

    This project was funded by EPA's Chesapeake Bay grant funding through the DNREC Watershed Assessment Section.       

    Laurel Storm Draining Marking event yielded a large turnout of volunteers

     

     

    Laurel Storm Drain Marking, June 2009

    Nearly 30 volunteers from the Town of Laurel, Delaware Surfriders, Nanticoke Creekwatchers, and George, Miles, and Buher, Inc. joined together on June 13th to mark the storm drains in Laurel.  We were lucky that the rain held off for this fun-filled event so that volunteers could pick up trash and label approximately 260 storm drains that empty into Broad Creek.  This project was funded by EPA's Chesapeake Bay grant funding through the DNREC Watershed Assessment Section.     

       

     

     

    Greenwood Storm Drain Marking, May 2009

    Twenty volunteers from the Peach Blossom 4-H Club marked the storm drains in Greenwood with medallions stating, "No Dumping. Drains to Waterways" on May 15.

    The evening started with an educational presentation about stormwater pollution, and ended with pizza in the new town park. This event was a cooperation among the DNREC Watershed Assessment Section, DNREC Sediment and Stormwater Program, Town of Greenwood, and the Peach Blossom 4-H Club from Greenwood. This project was funded by EPA's Chesapeake Bay grant funding through the DNREC Watershed Assessment Section. 

     

     

    Georgetown Storm Drain Marking, August 2008

    The weather was great for the Georgetown Storm Drain Marking event, held the morning of Aug. 22, 2008. Almost 90 volunteers participated, including Georgetown's mayor and town council, the town's police chief, Boys and Girls Club, Easter Seals, Georgetown town staff, Delmarva Christian High School, Boy Scout Troop 95, Korean Veterans Association (Delaware Chapter #1), Sussex County employees, Harms Engineering, Representative Joe Booth of the 37th District, and candidates for office Bob Ricker, Mike Wyatt, Aaron Chaffinch, and Greg Fuller. This event was held in cooperation with the DNREC Sediment and Stormwater Program, DNREC Nonpoint Source Program, Town of Georgetown, University of Delaware Water Resource Agency, and University of Delaware Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials. Funding was provided by the DNREC Non-point Source Section’s 319 grant (Clean Water Act).     

     
    Nafisha Butler of the Southbridge HOPE Commission Youth Employment Program places a medallion on a drain in Southbridge


    Southbridge, Wilmington, October-November 2007

    In fall of 2007, a team of 10 teenagers from the Southbridge HOPE Commission Youth Employment Program spent two weeks marking storm drains in Wilmington’s Southbridge neighborhood. While marking the drains, the students also cleaned leaves and trash from the drains to help prevent street flooding. 

    The South Wilmington Storm Drain Marking project was initiated through the South Wilmington Special Area Management Plan (SAMP), a cooperative effort that seeks to revitalize South Wilmington in an environmentally, socially and economically sustainable manner. 

    The storm drain marking project follows on the heels of a City of Wilmington initiative to clean debris and sediment from clogged sewer pipes in Southbridge. This work was recommended by the SAMP Drainage Study. The storm drain marking project is a great example of how community action and education can help support on-the-ground infrastructure improvements.  

    This project was a collaborative effort between the DNREC Sediment and Stormwater Program, DNREC Coastal Programs, and the Southbridge HOPE Commission Youth Employment Program.  The City of Wilmington Department of Public Works provided the medallions, glue, and other supplies for the storm drain marking project. 


    Volunteers gather before adhering storm drain medallions to the 250 storm drains in Milton, Del. Milton Storm Drain Marking, September 2007

    On Sept. 8, 2007, the Storm Drain Marking Program took place in Milton, Delaware, where more than 15 volunteers from the community showed up to install attractive medallions stating, "No Dumping, Drains to River" to approximately 250 storm drains throughout the town. 

    On event day, volunteers were split into groups of three or more and given a map of the drains to be marked, a bag full of supplies, and instructions on why medallions are being installed and how to properly install them. Afterwards, every volunteer left with a tote bag having the logo of the medallion on the front.

    This program was a collaborative effort between the DNREC Sediment and Stormwater Program, DNREC Nonpoint Source Section, Town of Milton, Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials, and the University of Delaware Water Resources Agency.  Funding was provided by the DNREC Non-point Source Section’s 319 grant (Clean Water Act).   


    Lewes Storm Drain Marking, April 2007

    In the spring of 2007, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) piloted a project in Lewes, Delaware, to affix nearly 500 medallions to storm drains throughout the city. Registration for this event was overwhelmingly successful, with more than 65 participants from local organizations including the Zwaanendael Club, Lewes in Bloom, Lewes Yacht Club, Surf Riders (local surfing group), Lewes High School Honors Program, and local consulting firm Envirotech.

    Within 90 minutes, nearly all 500 storm drains in the City of Lewes had been marked. The pilot project was a success in every way, engaging conversation about the issues at hand, and involving community members of all ages in an effort to increase awareness about polluted stormwater runoff.

    Participating agencies included the DNREC Sediment and Stormwater Program, University of Delaware Water Resources Agency, Center for Inland Bays, University of Delaware Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials, and the City of Lewes. Funding was provided by the DNREC Non-point Source Section’s 319 grant (Clean Water Act). 

     

     

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